Hall Research releases compact audio video-on-UTP receiver with built-in RGB skew correction

14 11 2009

ura-sku_huge.thumbnail

Hall Research releases the URA-SKU, an ultra-compact PC video and audio on twisted-pair (UTP) receiver that features built-in RGB skew correction. The device uses 5-stage active equalization and 62 nanoseconds of skew adjustment for any UTP cable. It can reproduce the original audio and video in real time and with perfect clarity at a distance of up to 1,000 feet (300m). The URA-SKU supports video resolutions to 1920×1200 at any refresh rate. Digitally controlled adjustments eliminate the need to tweak pots or set dip-switches.

Hall Research announces the release of the Model URA-SKU Video-on-UTP receiver with skew correction. The URA-SKU is the most technically advanced and physically compact addition to Hall Research’s PC and HD audio & video extension systems that utilize twisted-pair cabling. The device allows for the reception of HD video and audio signals over a single CATx cable. The receiver incorporates 5-stage active equalization followed by precision RGB skew correction in order to accommodate any UTP or STP cable to 1,000 feet (300m).

The URA-SKU provides digitally controlled adjustments so the need for tweaking pots or setting dip-switches is eliminated.

“The URA-SKU receiver is the latest progression in our successful and mature video-over-UTP extension product line,” said Ali Haghjoo, Chief Executive Officer for Hall Research. “This rugged and compact receiver includes mounting brackets which makes it ideal to be located behind any large LCD or video projector,” Mr. Haghjoo concluded.

The URA-SKU has a retail price of $299 and is available now through Hall Research’s authorized dealers or by contacting Hall Research at (714) 641-6607.





Christie Launches The New Digital Canvas: Christie MicroTiles

14 11 2009

microtiles-escalators.thumbnail

Breakthrough Modular Technology Unleashes Freedom to Create Virtually Seamless Digital Displays in Any Size, Any Shape, Any Place

Unique MicroTiles digital display technology that creates a virtually seamless digital canvas in almost any size or shape – and offers spectacular, crisp visuals at any distance – is now available from Christie.

Christie MicroTiles are modular digital display tiles that can be stacked and clustered like building blocks to create display walls of any shape or scale, using an entirely new, advanced optical design that produces unparalleled levels of brightness, contrast and color reproduction.

The Christie MicroTiles system represents a huge step forward in large-format digital display technology, offering superior color and image reproduction, the widest possible viewing angles, and a near absence of seams on display walls, with only a 1mm gap between the tiles. The groundbreaking LED- and DLP-based system is designed for long, reliable commercial use in public areas, with no lamps or other consumable parts to replace. The LED light engine, a key component of MicroTiles, is rated at 65,000 hours to half brightness usage, or nearly 7.5 years of continuous operation.

With a screen size of 16 inches (408mm) wide x 12 inches (306mm) high, the tiles also feature a shallow depth of only 10 inches (260mm) and require just 2 inches (50mm) of minimal clearance for rear ventilation. Christie engineers designed the MicroTiles to be fully and easily serviced from the front. The tiles are “self-aware” – meaning that time-consuming and costly color calibration needed to keep conventional “video walls” looking uniform, is automatically completed by the sensors built into the MicroTiles.

While the engineering behind the display tiles is extraordinarily sophisticated, walls of tiles are controlled by a simple unit that processes the signal from the most popular digital signage and media players.

Known around the globe for high quality digital projection systems, Christie has had its new tiles in R&D for two years. Technology and visual design experts who’ve seen sneak previews this year have described the system as “one of the wonders of the world in displays.”

“MicroTiles represent a distinct revolution in display technology, that allows users to create their own digital canvas or digital wallpaper,” said Bob Rushby, the co-inventor and chief technology officer at Christie. “With MicroTiles, users can express their creativity and vision, and assemble the displays in ways that have previously been unattainable using current flat panel LCD, plasma or LED walls.”

“Assemble the tiles any way you like, take them apart and re-assemble them in a new configuration, and they ‘recognize’ each other every time and adjust the image automatically,” Rushby added. “Our partners are discovering new ways of using digital display that would have been impossible or impractical before MicroTiles.”

The spectacular image quality and modular flexibility of the MicroTiles system opens up wide possibilities for companies charged with designing and creating large, vivid visual displays for architectural installations, out-of-home advertising, event centers, command and control facilities and retail environments. MicroTiles can easily be incorporated to fit within the physical constraints or opportunities of a building and eliminate all the compromises made when using other display technologies.

“Christie MicroTiles open up a whole new world of possibilities for the various display markets,” Rushby added. “They offer an innovative, visually striking digital solution to deliver messages and make them memorable.”

[press release]





Logitech to Acquire LifeSize Communication

11 11 2009

logo-logitechLifeSize_logo

Logitech International (SIX: LOGN) (Nasdaq: LOGI), a leader in PC video communication, today announced that it has agreed to acquire privately held LifeSize Communications of Austin, Texas for $405 million in cash. LifeSize is a global leader in high definition (HD) video communication solutions, with more than 9,000 video conferencing customers across 80 countries in large enterprises, small-to-medium businesses (SMBs) and public healthcare, education and government organizations.

LifeSize’s industry leading HD video conferencing solutions provide superior quality of experience and are flexible, easy to use, install and manage – with unmatched price/performance.

“We expect this acquisition to enable Logitech to extend our leadership in video communication beyond the desktop,” said Gerald P. Quindlen, Logitech president and chief executive officer. “Together we can make life-like, HD-quality video communication as mainstream and seamless as a telephone, for meeting participants in the boardroom, at their office desk, in a remote-location meeting room, telecommuting from home or on the go with a laptop.”

“LifeSize was founded on the vision of providing life-like visual-communication solutions to change the way the world communicates,” said Craig Malloy, LifeSize co-founder and chief executive officer. “We believe that together with Logitech, we can realize that vision for all enterprises – private and public – and small and medium businesses. Our combined proven innovation can accelerate mainstream adoption of video communication by anyone, anywhere.”

Logitech and LifeSize plan to pursue existing and new relationships with unified communications, collaboration and VoIP industry partners and competitors to drive the development of an open eco-system for interoperable video communication.

Logitech and LifeSize also expect to further video communication growth by leveraging their combined technology expertise as well as Logitech’s world-class manufacturing and supply chain operations, extensive R&D, expertise in user experience and globally recognized brand.

Logitech plans for LifeSize to operate as a separate division in Austin under the leadership of Mr. Malloy as the LifeSize Communications chief executive officer, reporting to Mr. Quindlen. LifeSize expects approximately $90 million in revenue in CY 2009, with CY 2010 revenue expected to grow between 40 percent and 60 percent. Logitech expects the acquisition to be neutral to slightly positive to its operating income (excluding acquisition-related charges) in FY 2011, ending March 31, 2011, and positive thereafter.

The acquisition is subject to customary closing conditions, including antitrust approval, and is expected to close in December.





Sony’s new ultra high resolution SRX T420 4K SXED projector with 8.8 million pixels

7 11 2009

sony_sxrd-4k_200

Sony has expanded its line of ultra-high-resolution 4K SXRD projectors with a new model that provides 8.8 million pixels at more than 20,000 lumens—the highest brightness to date of any Sony projector. The new SRX-T420 projector is designed to deliver enhanced performance and flexibility in large-venue commercial applications such as entertainment, auditorium/lecture-hall presentations, virtual reality, and simulation. The new model incorporates the same 4096×2160 resolution as its successful SXRD counterparts with many similar design and control elements for user-friendliness. However, in addition to its high brightness, it delivers an enhanced contrast ratio of 3000:1, as well as a range of new improvements in performance, interface capability, control software, and installation capabilities. MSRP: N/ASony





Stewart Audio introduces three sub compact power amplifiers: the AV25, CVA-25, and CVA-50

7 11 2009

StewartAudio_AV25_200

Stewart Audio introduces three sub­compact power amplifiers: the AV25, CVA-25, and CVA-50. Each model weighs less than 1lb., and they are specifically designed to be located in places typically off-limits to traditional-sized amplifiers—without compromising sound quality or power. Equally significant, these amplifiers are Energy Star-compliant, and they incorporate Stewart Audio’s proprietary Signal Sense Power Technology (SSPT), which ensures the amp is only powered when there is a signal present, thus saving energy and extending product life. Each model is Plenum-rated and designed to provide convenience and installation flexibility above the ceiling or in other environmental air spaces. This feature makes these amps a great choice for concealing the unit to prevent theft. With available pole- and universal-mounting brackets, these power amps can be pole-mounted, attached behind flatpanel displays, recessed in lecterns, and placed in other locations—making them an exceptional choice for hospitality applications, presentation spaces, and classrooms. MSRP: $259 (AV25); $289 (CVA-25); $359 (CVA-50)

via [pressrelease]





Wireworks releases MCat-5 multipin-based multichannel Cat-5e network

7 11 2009

wireworks_mcat5_200

Wireworks debuted its new MCat-5 multipin-based, multichannel Cat-5e network cabling at AES 2009. MCat-5 simplifies network cabling by eliminating individual cable runs. This reduces the wear and tear on equipment by using a sturdy multipin connector instead of the standard RJ-45 connector, creating a rugged point-to-point secure connection. Additional benefits of MCat-5 include ease of use, simplified cable identification, and improved network durability. MCat-5 tails are configured to support six channels of 10/100/1000BASE-T signals and equipment requiring four pairs per RJ-45. Tails are also available to support 12 channels of 10/100BASE-T using cable-sharing technology.

via [pressrelease]





Modern LCD’s no longer have “Motion Blur” – says DisplayMate

7 11 2009

500x_motion_blur

study conducted by DisplayMate Technologies claims that the issue of “motion blur” so long associated with LCDs is no longer an issue in mid-to-high-end LCDs. However, manufacturers have no problem selling you gimmicks that supposedly fix the problem.

The HDTVs included models from the top-tier brands of (alphabetically) LG, Samsung, Sharp and Sony – from the mid-line to top-of-the-line models. All of the units were from the 2008 model year. Differences between the 2008 and 2009 models are primarily in their marketing hype. For this article we had three flagship top-of-the line LCD models from Samsung (LN-T5281F), Sharp (LC-52D92U) and Sony (KDL-52XBR4). By studying the top-of-the-line models from the market leaders we were assured of examining the state-of-the-art for each display technology and each manufacturer. The consumer mid-line models included LG (42LG50), Samsung (LN40A550P3F), and Sony (KDL-40V3000). The remaining two LCD units were consumer HDTVs but not commercially available models.

The top-of-the-line Sony XBR and Sharp units had 120 Hz screen refresh, the top-of-the-line Samsung had strobed LED backlighting, and all of the other units had standard 60 Hz screen refresh. The goal was to determine the degree to which this varied advanced technology affected visible motion blur.

DisplayMate analyzed the blur using moving test patterns, moving photographs and live video (a Nikon D90 DSLR with a shutter speed of 1/160th a second was used for the photography) and found that no actual motion blur detectable in any of the live video content—although there were incidents that were passed off as defects in the source video or temporary optical illusions.

After extensive side-by-side objective testing with moving test patterns, moving photographs and live video we found that there was no visually detectable difference in motion blur performance for current mid to top-of-the-line LCD HDTVs, regardless of their Response Time, 60 or 120 Hz refresh rates, strobed LED backlighting, or motion enhancement processing. While there was considerable motion blur in the moving test patterns, motion blur was simply not visually detectable in real live video content during our extensive side-by-side testing. With only a handful of minor exceptions, whenever blur was seen in live video we always found it to be in the source content or a temporary visual illusion that disappeared when the segments in question were reviewed. This is undoubtedly due to the way the brain processes and extracts essential information from dynamic and complex moving images.

In other words, DisplayMate thinks you are probably seeing things. Don’t be fooled by manufacturers charging extra for fancy motion blur technologies or claims of exceptional response times. If you purchased a mid to top tier model you shouldn’t have anything to worry about. Of course, this test doesn’t remotely cover all of the LCD brands out there, so I have to ask—based on your experience, do you believe that LCD makers have finally tamed the motion blur beast? [DisplayMate]